• August 31 2018 780
    Alex

    For many, the greatest draw to Egypt is the pyramids and the many other temples and ruins that stand as testament to one of the most fascinating civilizations of all time. For some, another world beckons — the one found under the surface of the Red Sea. For scuba divers, the Red Sea is one of the world’s dive meccas, somewhere every aquaholic dreams of making a pilgrimage some day. While the Red Sea has so many corners to explore, for this trip, my friend Kat and I decided to focus on the Sinai Peninsula and split our time between two bases: Dahab and Sharm El Sheikh. The truth is, Sharm El Sheikh didn’t really sound like my kind of place. It’s a fairly built-up, brash beach town where direct flights once brought package tourists from all over Europe to frolic in all-inclusives, leaving only to visit water parks rising out of the vast desert like mirages. Think the Cancun of the Middle East. But everyone we spoke to agreed that while Dahab had the best traveler vibes in Egypt and a series of incredible and unique dive experiences, the waters off Sharm El Sheikh boasted the areas healthiest and most vibrant reefs, as well as some world-famous wrecks. We simply couldn’t miss those, so we vowed to do Sharm El Sheikh our way. Kat and I met up at the Cairo airport after I said goodbye to my Travel Talk crew, and hopped a quick, cheap and easy flight to Sharm El Sheikh airport. Since we weren’t too fussed with spending large amounts of time on land in Sharm, we’d booked a mini-liveaboard — but more on that later. We still had a night in Sharm El Sheikh on each end, and dang if we weren’t going to make the most of it. Though we briefly discussed taking advantage of the incredible prices at the mega-resorts dotting the shores of Sharm, we stuck to our roots and landed at a charming little boutique guesthouse, Sinai Old Spices. This place is the real deal — it’s tucked deep in an authentic Bedouin village, with herds of goats roaming the streets and locals smiling curiously at the foreigners arriving by taxi. Sinai Old Spices is run by a lovely Italian woman named Desi who has created a colorful oasis with a handful of uniquely decorated rooms, a lush pool, a restaurant serving beautiful fresh food, and hidden zones for relaxation around every corner. This is really saying something for a girl who normally can’t be pulled off the beach, but I can’t imagine staying anywhere else in Sharm El Sheikh. For $40USD a night including an unbelievable breakfast spread, it was a steal. I could have hung around Sinai Old Spices all day, but with really only one day to explore Sharm, we set off quickly. Unlike in Cairo, Uber doesn’t exist in Sinai, so we negotiated a flat rate with our hilariously crabby taxi driver from the airport instead (our flight had been delayed and our baggage had come out at the wrong terminal, and when we finally emerged victoriously from the airport his greeting was to chastise us for being late, ha.) Though I’d heard so-so reviews of the local Old Market and the Sahaba Mosque, I wanted to give Kat a well-rounded first trip to Egypt, so we decided to give it a go. Sadly, Sharm El Sheik and Sinai on the whole have struggled to recover from the ongoing conflict between Islamist militants and Egyptian security forces, which has included attacks on civilians and tourists. Bombings in the resort town of Taba in 2004, a series of bombings across Sharm in 2005, the bombing of a plane flying into Sharm el Sheikh Airport in 2015, and a mosque attack in 2017 that killed hundreds of locals (which spooked travelers despite being hours away from any tourist destinations) have turned a once vibrant beach town into a ghost town.  

  • August 31 2018 780
    Simran

    Journeying through Kerala’s enchanting backwaters on this three-night, four-day excursion is a wonderful way to not only experience local life, but also to witness some of the state’s most captivating points of interest in just a few days. During the Kerala Backwaters tour, you’ll start by hopping aboard a plane and landing in Cochin, which is where a SITA representative will meet you at the airport. You’ll then head off to enjoy a tasty breakfast at the Courtyard by Marriott, before starting an exciting tour of Cochin. Your local guide will take you sightseeing, where you’ll visit the oldest Jewish synagogue, the famous Chinese fishing nets, St Francis Church (the oldest European church in India) and the Dutch Palace at Mattancherry. After your tour of Cochin, you’ll hop aboard an air-conditioned vehicle and be driven to Kumarakom (approx. 1.5 hours), where you’ll check into your hotel for the night. Your second morning will be spent exploring Philipkutty’s Farm, which is located on a small island in the backwaters by Vembanad Lake, the largest lake in Kerala. With coconut, nutmeg, cocoa, bananas, peppers and many other fruits and vegetables growing on the farm, you’ll be pleased to know you’ll also enjoy lunch here, before heading back to your hotel for an afternoon at leisure. Your final full day will give you the opportunity to really get to know Kerala’s intricate network of backwaters. You’ll be transferred to the boat jetty, to then board your traditional rice boat for a day cruise. The comfortable houseboats have proper rooms and attached toilets but were originally used as ferries to transport rice. You’ll enjoy lunch on board and will be able to soak up all the sights and sounds of the palm-lined waterways. Look out for the plethora of wildlife, including frogs and crabs, kingfishers, darters, cormorants, otters, turtles and more. After your cruise around Kerala’s backwaters, you’ll head back to your resort to enjoy the rest of your evening at leisure. The next day, after a fulfilling breakfast, you’ll be transferred back to the airport (approx. 1.5 hours) where you’ll board your onward flight, whether that’s home, or to continue your India adventures in Goa.  

  • October 01 2018 780
    Sam Kapoor

    Journeying through Kerala’s enchanting backwaters on this three-night, four-day excursion is a wonderful way to not only experience local life, but also to witness some of the state’s most captivating points of interest in just a few days. During the Kerala Backwaters tour, you’ll start by hopping aboard a plane and landing in Cochin, which is where a SITA representative will meet you at the airport. You’ll then head off to enjoy a tasty breakfast at the Courtyard by Marriott, before starting an exciting tour of Cochin. Your local guide will take you sightseeing, where you’ll visit the oldest Jewish synagogue, the famous Chinese fishing nets, St Francis Church (the oldest European church in India) and the Dutch Palace at Mattancherry. After your tour of Cochin, you’ll hop aboard an air-conditioned vehicleJourneying through Kerala’s enchanting backwaters on this three-night, four-day excursion is a wonderful way to not only experience local life, but also to witness some of the state’s most captivating points of interest in just a few days. During the Kerala Backwaters tour, you’ll start by hopping aboard a plane and landing in Cochin, which is where a SITA representative will meet you at the airport. You’ll then head off to enjoy a tasty breakfast at the Courtyard by Marriott, before starting an exciting tour of Cochin. Your local guide will take you sightseeing, where you’ll visit the oldest Jewish synagogue, the famous Chinese fishing nets, St Francis Church (the oldest European church in India) and the Dutch Palace at Mattancherry. After your tour of Cochin, you’ll hop aboard an air-conditioned vehicleJourneying through Kerala’s enchanting backwaters on this three-night, four-day excursion is a wonderful way to not only experience local life, but also to witness some of the state’s most captivating points of interest in just a few days. During the Kerala Backwaters tour, you’ll start by hopping aboard a plane and landing in Cochin, which is where a SITA representative will meet you at the airport. You’ll then head off to enjoy a tasty breakfast at the Courtyard by Marriott, before starting an exciting tour of Cochin. Your local guide will take you sightseeing, where you’ll visit the oldest Jewish synagogue, the famous Chinese fishing nets, St Francis Church (the oldest European church in India) and the Dutch Palace at Mattancherry. After your tour of Cochin, you’ll hop aboard an air-conditioned vehicle

  • November 09 2018 780
    Sanyana Khan

    It was built in 1613 by Madho Singh, son of the Mughal general, Man Singh of Amber. Legend has it that the city was cursed by Guru Balu Nath, a hermit who had warned the rulers that the shadow of Bhangarh Palace should not reach his retreat. But Ajab Singh, Madho Singh’s grandson, disregarded this warning and built the palace higher. Once the palace’s shadow covered Balu Nath’s forbidden den, the hermit cursed the palace. Some say the entire town was destroyed overnight, and whenever a house is built here, the roof collapses. Locals also say that all those who have lingered here after dark were never heard from again.

  • November 02 2018 780
    rasvin

    Apart from a great name, PS I’m On My Way boasts a fun, exciting, and action-packed travel blog. The homepage makes an immediate impact on new and returning viewers with a full-screen image and bright eye-catching color scheme. The use of a parallax effect, combined with rows of article images and a beautiful full-width background image with text overlay, helps break up the page and give it a dynamic feel. User-friendly, PS I’m On My Way displays an interactive map enabling the audience to find the countries and relevant articles that interest them. On individual blog pages, sidebars contain numerous helpful widgets including information on the blog author, social media follow buttons, an email opt-in form, and much more.

  • November 02 2018 780
    Rajendra

    The Poor Traveler uses a full-screen slider that displays awe-inspiring images which will immediately connect with wanna-be travelers. An Agoda search bar sits at the bottom of this slider. This helps visitors find accommodation in their chosen city, which in turn, aids the monetization of the blog. Social media plays an important role for this travel blog. Social media buttons are shown, including the number of current followers. An impressive Instagram feed is also displayed on every page, as well as underneath each blog post.